When Your First Born Daughter Turns 13

The act of having, caring for, protecting creates a sense of undeserving custody, even possession, at least in the manner we speak. My daughter. My baby. That child filled a previously non-existent place in your heart. Not until the moment she walked in, did you realize it was there, that it would have to be filled with her, only her, until the day you took your last breath. But deep down, from the moment that baby is born, the only lesson to be learned is the process and ability of letting go. It is actually that baby who possesses your heart, who you find yourself thinking about ceaselessly, incessantly and lovingly, while learning to watch her grow, learning to trust and let go. CLICK TO READ

Through the eyes of a 9-year-old: Observations from a child of today

I asked her if she had a favorite saying or expression. She was quick to say, “’Let’s Roll’ because those were the last words Todd Beamer said before he died. It’s a very nice and strong way to say let’s go. I like that!” If she could get a message to every person in the world, Jacqueline says she would say this: “Thank you for being good people. Give money to the people who are poor and be nice to everyone. And do not be on the electronics a lot, but use your imagination because so many people are on their phones these days.” CLICK TO READ MORE

Of Lives, Trees and Memories

They sat in a swing with their great-grandmother, a spunky, deeply religious, hard-working southern lady in her 90s. She makes them laugh. They love it when she calls them “Cher” (pronounced sha), a Cajun-French word for “sweet” or “dear”. They love the way she talks about herself in the third person, “Ma packed up some shrimp for you.” And they love the old memory of her letting them have their first Dr. Pepper while telling them, “Drink it or wear it.”
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